The National Hereditary Breast Cancer Helpline

The National Hereditary Breast Cancer Helpline was founded in 1996 by Wendy Watson, at a time when little or nothing was generally known about Hereditary Breast Cancer. How it all began:

Wendy held the first Hereditary Breast Cancer Awareness week to mark the launch of the helpline. This was warmly received by the whole genetic community and supported by the late Princess Diana (click the letter to the right to read). Two genes had at that time been found which, if faulty, conferred around an 80-90% breast cancer risk.

The main aim of the helpline was to ensure that those worried about their family history had access to full information on all the options currently available, referrals where appropriate, and full peer support for whatever option was chosen. Most importantly that those affected had the opportunity to make informed choices. It is also an important role of the helpline to reassure those worrying unnecessarily. To that end the Helpline has been enormously successful, given the feedback over this past 19 years.

From the outset one of the main problems was inequity of service. The Helpline was instrumental in bringing the ‘Management of women at risk’ to the attention of the DoH and in 2006 guidelines were developed and announced by NICE, with representation and approval from the Helpline. The Helpline has also been involved with the current moratorium on ‘Genetic testing and insurance’, and was also active in alerting the government to the worrying situation of the gene patent, which, if allowed to go forward, would have made genetic testing prohibitively expensive for the NHS, thus costing lives.

The Helpline is manned as near as possible 24 hours per day, every day, although an answering service is always available. To date many thousands of calls have been taken worldwide and Wendy has given numerous talks internationally. In 2001 Wendy was called upon to help advise on the launch of a similar incentive in the USA.

Our founder, Wendy, took part in an interview on Radio 5 Live with the lovely Richard Horsley and his daughter Jill Ryder , regrading our first ever genes don’t care what you wear day. Please have a listen by pressing the play button below:

Make one person aware..

What it means:

Hopefully never have to tell my little boy…

amy

I’m BRCA2 positive and I’ll be having preventative surgery this year. This means that I will hopefully never have to tell my little boy that Mummy’s got cancer. Mummy’s having new boobies is a much easier conversation to have with a 3 year old!

Amy Wiltshire

A chance for a life

sue

Having the knowledge has given me the chance for a life, which is more than my Mum, grandmother, uncle and two cousins had.

Sue Hall

A little part of our mothers will always live on in us!

nicky

A little part of our mothers will always live on in us! They weren’t given the same choices we have today with BRCA testing and so sadly lost their lives way too young. Knowledge is power!

Nicky Quinn

A huge step ahead of Cancer

cora

Knowing made me stronger! Your chance to be one huge step ahead of Cancer. It gives me hope that my children won’t hear “it’s bad news ….”

Cora Hughes

Knowledge is power

lois

Being aware of my BRCA status has given me the knowledge and power and tools to change my future

Lois cox

My diagnosis

sarah

My BRCA1 diagnosis has given my family the power to minimise the risk of developing hereditary related cancer, like I did.

Sarah Kennett

A mum’s gift

kelly

A gift given from my mum who can no longer be here to me, she’s given me awareness of what this means to my world, my life, my family.

Kelly Brawn
Wendy Watson Helpline Founder

Wendy Watson
Helpline Founder

hrh_letter

Wendy held the first Hereditary Breast Cancer Awareness week to mark the launch of the helpline in 1996. This was warmly received by the whole genetic community and supported by the late Princess Diana (click the letter above to read).